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DMT Toads

topic posted Mon, January 22, 2007 - 4:42 PM by  om
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Hi, I just copy pasted a bunch of random info I found on the net about psychedelic toads. I edited the fuck out of it, though, cuz it had all sorts of errors and typos in it. If anyone could be so kind as to point out any further mistakes in the following information and reply with the corrections, or if anyone has any further info regarding psychedelic toads that they would like to share, I would be greatly appreciative. Thanks for reading…


There are over 200 known species under the genus Bufo. These include Bufo marinus-also known as Bufo aqua, the common marine toad, native to the Amazon-and its related species: Bufo vulgaris from Europe, Bufo garganizans, from Asia; and the Colorado River toad Bufo alvarius. While these are the best known of the Bufo toads, there are also Bufo arenarum, Bufo valliceps, Bufo blombergi, Bufo quercicus, Bufo asper, Bufo fowerii, and Bufo formosus (Lyttle et al. 1993, 1996)


All Bufo toads have parotid glands on their backs. The parotid glands produce many different biologically active compounds-such as the neurotransmitters serotonin (5-hydroxy-tryptamine), epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine-which vary from species to species. These glands also often produce analogs of the above neurotransmitters, most notably of serotonin (5-HT), including 5-methoxy-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT), N-trimethyl-5-hydroxy-tryptamine (bufotenidine), dehydrobufotenine (a quaternary amine salt of bufotenine), and N,N-dimethylserotonin (bufotenine). Bufotenine is found in all Bufo species (Lyttle 1993).


Bufo toads also excrete from their parotid glands substances called bufodienolides, which are comprised of bufogenins (generally known as bufagins) and bufotoxins, which are extremely toxic cardioactive steroids. Bufogenins are a class of organic molecules that contain 24 carbon atoms in their structure, and they are biosynthesized from cholesterol, and they contain no nitrogen. Bufotoxins do contain nitrogen, however. There are five different kinds of bufotoxins: vulgarobufotoxin, cinobufotoxin, gambabufotoxin, marinobufotoxin and alvarobufotoxin (Lyttle 1993).


As stated above, the toxic venoms found in Bufo toads also consist of tryptamine bases. 5-HT and bufotenine are found in all the Bufo species. Bufo alvarius, actually, is the only known species to contain 5-MeO-DMT. Bufothionine is found in the Bufo gargarizans (Lyttle 1993).


The Bufo toad appears in cultural history as far back as 2000 BC. This may have started with the nature of the toad itself. Its life cycle is such that it tends to be born in the springtime, which is a rainy season in most parts of the world. As a result, frequent associations were made among toads, sexuality, fertility, and rain. This is evident from the fact that the Bufo toad was included (along with other toads and frogs) in the first primitive charms relating to sexuality and rain-fertility in many cultures. Often certain parts of the toad's anatomy were emphasized in these totemic-iconic representations, depending on the goal of the charm (Lyttle et al. 1993, 1996).


The toad's way of life tended to make it a mysterious, other-worldly creature to primitive peoples. The toad's tongue is quick enough that it cannot be followed by the human eye. The way a toad captures an insect with lightening speed can easily seem supernatural. Furthermore, the tongue rests with the tip towards the back of the throat, so that it lashes out like a "spear-throwing stick" to catch its prey (Grant 1980). To make matters all the more bizarre, toads cannot breathe with their mouths open. Toads are born out of (in) the mud, making their birth a mysterious occurrence. The year long life cycle of the toad made it seem as if it was generated out of mud (its birth) and then it would melt back into the mud; it was often seen as if the toads were rising from the dead. Further supernatural characteristics of the Bufo toad include its climbing ability. Toads can climb right-side-up, upside-down, and up over-hanging and outsloping walls. They have no teeth, and they tend to swallow their own skin as they shed it (Lyttle et al. 1996).


Art of the Olmecs, Aztecs, and Mayans depicts the Bufo toad as far back as 2000 BC. It is well known that at an Olmec burial cite in San Lorenzo archaeologists discovered huge numbers of Bufo marinus. It has been documented that these peoples consumed the toads for hallucinogenic purposes. (Lyttle et al. 1996) It is important to note that this particular species' parotid gland does not produce 5-MeO-DMT, a substance with clear hallucinogenic activity (Shulgin 1997; Perrine, 1996; Ciprian-Ollivier and Cetkovich-Bakmas 1997). If the Olmecs were indeed hallucinating from their toad rituals, they must have been doing so due to the presence of bufotenine. Bufotenine's (controversial) psychoactivity will be discussed later in greater detail.


Aztec works from the same period also contain a plethora of toad iconography. Interestingly, depictions of the Bufo toad are specific in their focus. The parotid glands are always emphasized and are represented by three circles drawn on the back of the head (Lyttle et al. 1996). Sometimes there was a reference to a gem being in the middle of the circles. It seems as if the parotid gland's center was the center of the iconographical bull’s-eye, as it were.


The Mayans, like the Olmecs, also used the Bufo in their funerary practices. Thousands of toads were found in their burial vessels in Seibal, Mexico. The Mayans were also known to use the toads for ritual hallucinogenic purposes. The Potomam Maya used a drink called Chicha in their rituals. Chicha consisted of sugar fermented with a live toad and toad poisons (Lyttle et al. 1996). It is unlikely that the Mayans were using the Bufo alvarius-the only Bufo species that has 5-MeO-DMT in its venom-in their practices, as it is native to North America, not Mexico. Again, it seems as if we are presented with an example of historical hallucinogenic consumption of toads where the only possible psychoactive ingredient is bufotenine.


Meso American and South American tribes used toad excretions and extractions in tribal practices. Curanderos (shamanic healers) and brujos (sorcerers) made medicinal preparations and potions using the Bufo venom. First, they would irritate the toad gently-picking the toad up by hand could do the trick-so as to cause the toad to release its poison from the parotid glands. The poison was then collected in small bowls and subjected to secret techniques. These techniques were passed on from generation to generation of curanderos. The Bufo venom (in whatever capacity) was then repeatedly treated over a fire, so as to remove the harmful elements, presumably the bufotoxins. The remaining substance was left to harden, when it could be rolled into pills for future use, i.e., as a "love magic" (Lyttle et al. 1996).


Peruvian Indians and Guyana peoples also used Bufo toad poisons in their medicinal practices. The venom was rubbed into people's skin through cuts and put into their eyes, in order to allow their skills to be received by the "Toad Mother." Ancient Tanani peoples of Bolivia also showed their "Earth Mother" motif as a monstrous toad (Lyttle et al. 1996).


For thousands of years, Chinese healers have used Bufo extractions in a medicinal preparation called ch'an su. The Bufo toad has played a role in the medicinal, cultural, and religious histories of Tibet, Nepal, India, Germany, and Africa for centuries. Even Greek mythology contains countless toad references. The Greek gods Dionysus, Zeus, Diana, and Hera were all associated with Bufo toads. The Temple of Sparta and the Temple of Delphi both have may sculpted toads on the buildings themselves.


The seeds of a South American legume, Anadenanthera colombrina, are used by the Argentine Shamans in Chaco Central, and have been shown to be dramatically psychedelic. However, extremely sophisticated spectroscopic analysis has shown bufotenine to be their only alkaloid component (Shulgin 1997).


Bufotenine has also been found in several species of Amanita mushrooms, notably Amanita mappa, Amanita muscaria, and Amanita pantherina. Amanita mushrooms have been known for centuries to be psychoactive. Although the main psychoactive alkaloid in psychedelic mushrooms is psilocybin, the fact that these particular species contain bufotenine has probably added to the notion that bufotenine is itself psychedelic.


Toads' relationship to mushrooms has infiltrated the language of cultures across the globe for centuries. The English word "toad stool" dates back to 1398. The Welsh use the expression "bwyd y llfant" (toad's bread), and "caws llfant" (toad's cheese). The Dutch word "paddestoel" (toad's stool) is nearly identical to the English expression. The Norwegians use the word "paddehatt" (toad's hat), while the French say "pain de crapaud" (toad's bread), the Ukrainians use "zhabjachi hyrb" to mean "toadlike mushroom", the Basque expression "amoroto" means "toad-like thing", and for the Chinese, it's "ha-ma chun" (toad mushroom) (Lyttle et al. 1996).


Clearly the cross cultural abundance of the link between toads and mushrooms is significant. It would make complete sense to argue that the word "toad stool" for a mushroom has an etymology that is related to the similarities between the toads and the mushrooms. As the alkaloids of both had not yet been isolated in 1398, it is most probably the mind-altered state induced by both the amphibian and fungus that was perceived to be similar enough to warrant the coining of such an expression.


Subjective experiences of 5-MeO-DMT all invariably attest to its psychoactivity. Comments include "It was a glimpse into my future," "a merely intense psychedelic state," "a kind of cosmic consciousness type of experience," and "I remember switching to a perception where the endless and intricate phosphene was love and the energy of light. I called upon those forces within my being to realign and submit, to let go of all of the cogent fears and just exist ... and that innate decision saved me a lot of psychic damage" (Shulgin 1997). There is no question as to the psychedelic nature of the drug. Interestingly, it is not a scheduled drug on the Federal Controlled Substances Act, but as an analog of both DMT and bufotenine, prosecution could still legally occur under the Controlled Substances Analog Act.


Regardless of the psychoactivity of bufotenine when administered intravenously, it is inactive orally (Lyttle et al. 1993, 1996; Shulgin 1997; Perrine 1996). "Toad-licking," and the hallucinations that it allegedly produces, remain an urban myth [Editor’s Note: however if you took lots of MAOI’s then poked frogs until they secreted venom and then consumed large amounts of the venom then you would go into Analogue World for who knows how long…or you could just smoke the dried venom without any MAOI’s; the dried venom can be up to 15 percent pure 5-meo-dmt]


The practice of "toad-licking" in the United States started in the 1960's, when drug users learned of the Bufo toad's historical role in visionary experiences. But it was the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) that was actually responsible for the explosion of the practice in the mid-1980's. Media sensationalization ensued, spreading word about "psychedelic toads" across the nation. George Root, a former administrator at SP Labs in Miami, Florida, said on the subject in 1990, "... there has been much speculation in the anthropological literature regarding the possible hallucinogenic uses Bufo. This debate is largely based on the fact that Bufo is a common representation in the art of some Meso American peoples ... and the fact that Bufo skeletal remains have been discovered at archaeological sites. ... Speculations aside ... there is a very good reason why licking toads will not get you high. The toxic compounds are likely to kill you before you could possibly consume enough bufotenine to have any hallucinogenic effect" (Lyttle et al. 1996).


Bufo toads have been extremely important to cultures around the world for thousands of years. They have been valuable to medicine and could continue to be. Today, the Drug Enforcement Administration continues to arrest people caught licking toads, charging them with the ingestion of bufotenine. While "toad licking" cannot cause hallucinations, recent literature indicates that bufotenine (found in all Bufo toads) is psychedelic. Furthermore, it may be a useful drug for diagnosis, treatment, and research on psychosis.


[Editor’s Note: I saw a video in college about how Hawaiian cane toads were shipped to Australia to take care of a terrible insect problem that farmers were having; the cane toads resolved the insect problem, but the toads themselves became a FAR worse infestation to the country than the insects. The Hawaiian cane toads are extremely psychedelic when ingested in any form, and the toads themselves have become controlled substances in Australia. People in Australia habitually boil them into soups and consume them, or dry out the toad skins and smoke them. They’re all over the place in some cities; people will have a hundred or more in their homes sometimes, in which case they don’t get arrested. However, if someone’s caught consuming / preparing / distributing the Hawaiian cane toads in Australia, then can face over ten years in federal prison, along with fines totaling several thousands of dollars. So lets overthrow all world governments through education!!!]
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    Re: DMT Toads

    Mon, January 22, 2007 - 5:54 PM
    oh man killer post thank you. i enjoyed it immensely...
    • Re: DMT Toads

      Mon, January 22, 2007 - 6:08 PM
      good one but i dotn think many people here in australia really boil soup from the toads. and i wouldnt say it is habitual either. but they are truly a fucked up pest and the people that brought them here need thier head checked as they are takgin over and killign our native frogs and insects.

      this might be your documentary you saw? www.imdb.com/title/tt0130529/
      pretty funny film that one, i laughed my arse of watchign that years ago.

      i am not sure they actually did a great job on the cane pest they were intorduced for. which makes it even worse.

      from here www.badmovies.org/movies/canetoads/

      ANE TOADS: AN UNNATURAL HISTORY - 3 Slimes
      Not Rated
      Copyright 1987 Film Australia.
      Reviewed 9 December 2001.

      The Characters
      Green Dot Cane Toads - Enormous amphibians (oh no, it's Toadzilla!) that were imported to Australia. They are big, ugly, horny, and secrete a deadly poison.
      Green Dot Dr. Kerr - One of the men who, back in 1932, thought the cane toad would solve Australia's sugar cane pest problem. He was wrong, but goes on merrily collecting his pension while the poisonous toads muck up the continent's ecosystem.
      Green Dot Dr. Ingram - Herpetologist with way too much practice at mimicking the mating call of a male cane toad.
      Green Dot Dr. Archer - A specialist in the study of small rodents. He carries a grudge against the warty invaders ever since his marsupial native cat gnawed on one and subsequently died. Here's toad juice in your eye.
      Green Dot Syd - Police detective involved in the prosecution of drug users. Lick the toad and get five years mate.
      Green Dot Paul - Listening to him describing how amorous cane toads strangled his goldfish would be bad enough, his extreme speech impediment (he stutters, really bad) just makes the testimony a test of human endurance.
      Green Dot David and Elvie - Two weirdoes who love the confounded little monsters, even waxing sentimental while talking about them.
      The Plot
      "Cane Toads" is a strange documentary about yet another animal that humans have introduced to Australia. As with many of the others, it is doing a fine job of breeding out of control. The fact that it appears here at Badmovies.org should clue you in to the work's eccentric nature. Part of this can be blamed on the cane toads themselves (you will read why shortly) and the rest on some weird people armed with film equipment. Add a soundtrack with music reminiscent of a low budget horror movie at times, then suddenly shifting gears into "The Cane Toad Blues." Now you see why this naturalist romp makes me giggle.

      During the late 20's and early 30's, Australia's sugar industry had a big problem: the cane beetle. Apparently this insect spends its early life as a grub chewing on sugar cane roots, then develops into a beetle that also burrows. To combat this pest the Australians imported one hundred and two cane toads (Bufo marinus). Since the beetles are either flying or underground, they seldom fall victim to a hungry cane toad. The amphibians, finding themselves out of work and with nothing else to do, started making little toads.

      A reoccurring theme is the cane toad's single-minded determination to propagate the species. Dr. Ingram was kind enough to describe amplexus, the process of their mating, in sordid detail. He even had a boy and girl toad for demonstration purposes, but they seemed a little shy when under pressure. In the wild though - look out! A female toad can lay tens of thousands of eggs every year and some lucky fellow is going to fertilize as many as he can. Tens of thousands! I get blue ba... ...er, tired, just thinking about it.

      Cut to another scene of a scientist motoring down a country road while the radio blares "I Want Candy." He suddenly stops and gets out of the car, staring in sick astonishment at yet another cane toad mating spectacle. A male toad, atop a female, is trying to make more baby toads. Forget the fact that he is conducting business in the middle of the road; Mrs. Toad is roadkill! I don't mean just dead, either; the female was mashed quite flat and had been dead several hours! The human voyeur's face was priceless. Printing "What in the bloody hell?" on his forehead with a permanent marker would have been a waste.

      Following that eye opener, I made a promise to Katie that, should I ever find her dead in the road, I would not attempt coitus. She seemed relieved.

      "Frogger" jokes are hard to avoid during this movie. The fact that cane toads are often casualties while crossing roadways comes as no surprise, but the director made certain to include numerous shots from a toad's point of view. Hop, hop, hop... ...you get the idea. Then there is one bloke who describes, in detail, the art of running over cane toads with his van. Watch in amazement as it roars down the road, swerving from one side to the other, popping toads all the way. The toads tend to puff up when threatened and being crushed under the tire makes them sound like a balloon popping.

      The other defense mechanism that the cane toad has is a very effective poison. Glands above their shoulders will spray deadly venom up to one meter when then toad is given a hard squeeze. This is the real problem with the imported monsters. They kill anything that eats them. Dogs, snakes, birds, etc. - all dead within minutes of getting a mouthful of poison. Dr. Archer learned the hard way that you should wear goggles when thumping a toad. This poison is what gave some people the idea of killing a toad, boiling it, and drinking the water to induce something like an LSD trip. Guess who the authorities attribute with inventing toad toking? Hippies, go figure...

      To counterbalance people who hate the imported amphibian, there are several interviews with cane toad boosters. Mostly these are old folks in command of dubious mental capacity. The one geezer, clad in his shorts and wife-beater, was almost in tears expressing his love for the lowly cane toad. Maybe it is time for a couple of state-funded rest homes in Australia. Of course, then you would still need to do something about the government officials who wanted to commission a one-meter cane toad statue for the town square.

      I cannot finish this article without talking about what is the single most disturbing part of the documentary. We are informed that cane toads are not particular about their diet. Considering the fact that they are extremely large (an adult's body can be more than six inches in length), the beasts eat whatever fits down their gullets. Well, at one point they filmed a toad eating a mouse. Not some sort of pygmy Australian species either, but a regular white lab mouse! You can even see the doomed rodent struggling, trying desperately to escape, but the cane toad gulps it down. Ahhhhh! I still cannot believe that it ate the freaking mouse!

      Shaken by the mouse's demise, I began imagining a movie in which giant cane toads (say a few hundred pounds) threaten a small town. Would they swallow humans whole? Even worse, considering their ardent nature, what if the movie's name was "Night of the Amplexus." Egad.
  • Re: DMT Toads

    Mon, January 22, 2007 - 7:39 PM
    the effects of the toad, as you note, are from a combination of several compounds, but you only give a description of people who are using 5 meo dmt. why dont you have a description of the effects of the toad venom itself? The toad venom smoked is a qualitatively different experience from consuming 5 meo dmt.
    what is a "merely intense psychedelic state"?

    "Subjective experiences of 5-MeO-DMT all invariably attest to its psychoactivity. Comments include "It was a glimpse into my future," "a merely intense psychedelic state," "a kind of cosmic consciousness type of experience," and "I remember switching to a perception where the endless and intricate phosphene was love and the energy of light. I called upon those forces within my being to realign and submit, to let go of all of the cogent fears and just exist ... and that innate decision saved me a lot of psychic damage" (Shulgin 1997). There is no question as to the psychedelic nature of the drug. Interestingly, it is not a scheduled drug on the Federal Controlled Substances Act, but as an analog of both DMT and bufotenine, prosecution could still legally occur under the Controlled Substances Analog Act.


    Regardless of the psychoactivity of bufotenine when administered intravenously, it is inactive orally (Lyttle et al. 1993, 1996; Shulgin 1997; Perrine 1996). "Toad-licking," and the hallucinations that it allegedly produces, remain an urban myth [Editor’s Note: however if you took lots of MAOI’s then poked frogs until they secreted venom and then consumed large amounts of the venom then you would go into Analogue World for who knows how long…or you could just smoke the dried venom without any MAOI’s; the dried venom can be up to 15 percent pure 5-meo-dmt]

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